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Vintage Fashion Clothing Blog | Beyond Retro

  • LFWM A/W 17: Trends


    What a way to start 2017- London Fashion Week Men’s has had us all in awe at the show stopping attire that our favourite London designers have been sending down the runway this January. At Beyond Retro, we’ve always got an eye out for the vintage influences that still reign strong on our runways and have picked out our favourite trends and some ideas on how you can recreate these looks with our unique vintage product for a style to suit you.

    CHUNKY KNITS
    It's mid winter and with summer just a distant memory, knitwear seems like the most practical of trends to strut out in, however style doesn't have to be compromised, wear bold bright and over sized. Don't let the January blues get you down!
    Bold is better! Check out Bobby Abley's initialed knits. Bold is better! Check out Bobby Abley's initialed knits. (Vogue.co.uk)

    Christopher Raeburn makes colour blocking cool again (vogue.co.uk) Christopher Raeburn makes colour blocking cool again (vogue.co.uk)

    JW Anderson isn't afraid of over sizing! JW Anderson isn't afraid of over sizing!

    Here are some of our favorite knitwear available online from as little as £12!
    aw17 knit
    From left: ONE - TWO - THREE - FOUR

    SPORTY SWEATS AND JACKETS
    Streetwear still has a strong presence at fashion week. We love the evolution of this 90’s look and its colourful story.
    Cottweiler, has creating an apocalyptic camper, ready for anything! Cottweiler, has creating an apocalyptic camper, ready for anything!

    Topman Design mix baggy and bright sportwear Topman Design mix baggy and bright sportwear

    Christopher Shannon takes inspiration from the 90s classic tracksuit Christopher Shannon takes inspiration from the 90s classic tracksuit

    Check out our Street wear and Branded Sportswear online, create your own individual sportswear look!

    MILITARY MEN
    Action man never goes out of fashion and LFMW saw an array of camo ensembles fighting their way into becoming 2017’s serious style staples!
    Liam Hodges isn't afraid of double camo - move over double denim! Liam Hodges isn't afraid of double camo - move over double denim!

    Craig Green (Winner of British Menswear Designer of the year) looks at traditional mariner men uniform.  Craig Green (Winner of British Menswear Designer of the year) looks at traditional mariner men uniform.

    Christopher Reaburn take the camo print more literal, pairing it with a chameleon bag Christopher Reaburn take the camo print more literal, pairing it with a chameleon bag

    Our fun mix of workwear will help you to rework these looks in an authentically vintage inspired way. Just check out our Beyond Retro LABEL camo sweat!
    364950_2995.jpg
    As well as these trends, 2017 has had a stylish kick off in the wake of London Mens with checks, denim and 70s influences. It's clear to see that gems from the past still make London the unique, fashionable haven it is today.

    Words: Bethany Powers
  • A Brief History of the Beret

    The beret is regarded as a classic French symbol, but it actually has a history that dates back to ancient Greece and the Romans, who named it the ‘Beretino’. The Romans in particular held the beretino in high regard and invented an applied colour law which created a distinction between aristocrats and commoners.

     Of course we are all aware of the beret’s significance in the military, as a piece of uniform that is altered over time depending on rank and station. However, Archaeology and Art History has shown us that the beret was popular among the nobility and also among artists across Europe throughout history. Of course the beret wearing eccentric artist has become as much of a stereotype as the beret clad French man dressed in stripes!

    Che Guevara (wikimedia) Che Guevara (wikimedia)


     The very specific association to France is predominantly due to the fact that mass production of the beret began in 1800s in factories around France, which resulted in the hat becoming a popular and cheap choice for the masses over there. The fact that the French had such a natural elegance and grace meant that the beret came to be regarded as a very chic and effortless accessory! What was once regarded as uniform, was transformed into a fashion statement!

     The beret has always held certain political undertones, not just through its ties to military uniform, but also to revolutionist uniform. ‘Guerrillero Heroico’, one of the most famous photographs of the Argentine revolutionary Che Guevara, shows him wearing a black beret with a brass star in 1960. Following this iconic image, the beret was revived in the sixties, this time with powerful revolutionist.

    Faye Dunaway - Bonnie and Clyde '67 Faye Dunaway - Bonnie and Clyde '67

     As well as proving popular with the masses, the iconic headgear was also the fashion choice of the stars. Faye Dunaway rocked the beret in ‘Bonnie and Clyde‘ in 1967 and no one can deny the cool elegant appeal that Bridget Bardot learnt the beret in the same decade.

    France Gall (pinterest) France Gall (pinterest)

     Once the style icons got their hands on the beret, it was cemented as a classic fashion item! It maintains its air of modernity even with an ancient history.

     The appeal of the beret certainly lives on and has become a part of long-standing stereotypes of the intellectual, artists, poets, bohemians, beatniks, film directors and hipsters. We have countless berets (in countless colours!) Online and even more In Store that are waiting to be picked up by anyone who fits the beret bill! Just wear this iconic piece with style, and perhaps lashings of eyeliner to resemble Bridget in the 60s, and make Beyond Retro proud.


  • BUFFALO STANCE


    If you ever been to Essex, you may have stumbled onto a place called Loughton , where there is a English hunt wear trend going on... In fact this look is dotted all around Blighty and usually consists of pristine Hunter Wellingtons, untarnished Barbour's and riding breeches. This has been going on since the Sloane Ranger look of the 1980’s, that embodied the young and affluent set of South Kensington and beyond. The country look has always been a go to for the fashion world but the vintage universe has its own great outdoor hero, an all American staple in the form of the buffalo plaid jacket.

    Where buffalo plaid gets it right over the Anglo version is its ability to fit better into an urban landscape than going whole hog Horse & Hound. By adopting English shoot wear you are - in a way - latching onto a world that has a preconceived status and ideal whereas the US version holds no supposed ideal to it

    1

    The back story to buffalo plaid is a good one and actually does has something to do with horned animals, thank God! Firstly, the plaid is in fact a tartan with its life starting in bonny Scotland and is one of the oldest (8th Century) and the family colours of the MacGregor clan! Yes, that’s right Rob Roy MacGregor - he who battled Mel Gibson in the great Hollywood audience battle of the 90’s. Apologies to all my Scottish companions.
    Fast-forward to the late 1800’s, Connecticut, USA - a burly Scot named Big Jock MacCluskey brought with him his ancestral clan tartan, The Rob Roy. Now old Jock was apparently a fearsome man to behold and one that left quite an impression with all he met including the local Sioux and Cheyenne Indians.

    Early 1930’s Buffalo Plaid Huntsman Suit Early 1930’s Buffalo Plaid Huntsman Suit


    Now Big Jock first made his living as a Buffalo hunter, then realizing that bartering was a far more lucrative and less energetic form of capital gain he became an Indian trader. This profession had all but been deserted by the European settlers after the defeat of General Custer by the Sioux.
    Jock though was sympathetic to the Indians cause and made comparisons with his own people’s plight with the English aggression through conquest. This was a rare occurrence in this time of holocaust that made the Indians not only respect Jock but, again due to his fearsome stance, slightly weary of him.

    Through this weary alliance the trading of buffalo pelts with various goods was the norm and on top of every brave’s wish list was a heavy woven blanket from Scotland. That’s right the tartan of Rob Roy!. So in awe of its vibrant red the Indians believed it contained the souls of MacCluskey’s fallen enemies that he had slain, Jock would nod his head to this and say, “Aye”. Such was the belief in this that when worn in battle it would protect the wearer from death.
    To round off this little bit of historical fact, the tartan became known as buffalo pledger, pledger being the Gaelic word for blanket. Due to the mispronunciation of this curious word by both American natives and settlers alike, in time it became shortened to plaid. This is said to be why tartan in the US is called plaid.

    3

    And there you go…more excitement than a John Wayne impersonator being mistaken for Clint Eastwood at Tesco’s.

    We always have a fantastic selection of vintage buffalo plaid from brands such as Woolrich, Filson and Pendleton - go have a hunt!

    Words: Oliver Abbott

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